#AgeMatters35

Did you know 52 % of women over the age of 35 would have made different decisions about their fertility, if they educated better when they were younger. Doctors don’t bring up the conversation unless they are asked. Your most fertile years are between 18 – 29 years of age, starting to decline at age 30.

The new norm is 35- 45 years of age where women are having children and during this time there is higher risks factors with pregnancies, higher number of miscarriages, and  lower egg count and quality. Women were unaware of that their fertility drops between the ages of 30 an 45 .

Pubic Health Priority

I am working with the CDC  to help bring awareness on the importance of educating women that age does matter when it comes to a woman’s fertility. The (WHO) World Health Organization and the (ASRM) American Society for Reproductive Medicine has defines infertility as a disease. One out of 8 couples are infertile, and to add to this environmental , chemical and occupational exposures now and earlier in life could affect fertility outcome. These exposures can also affect pregnancy outcomes ( multiple births, premature deliveries ) and increase likely hood of adult onset diseases  such as ovarian , prostate, testicular cancers, metabolic syndrome and (PCOS) polycystic ovary syndrome.

Infertility can serve as a marker of past, present and future health and provide a window of opportunity to improve care for affected reproductive aged women and men . Infertility can have a pubic health implications that go beyond just simply the ability to have children.*1

Please check out the National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection, Prevention and Management of Infertility

*1- CDC-National Public Health Action Plan for the Detection, Prevention and Management of Infertility